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Powerboats Experience Days & Gifts

Take a powerboat offshore and experience the thrill of speeding down the Solent.

You’ll get your chance to take the boat round a specially designed racing circuit to see what it (and you) can do! Who needs a supercar when you have a Honda Formula 4-stroke raceboat?

All powerboating sessions are hosted by experienced instructors who are champions in their field (or, er, lake?) and you don’t need any experience to have a go at this exhilarating watersport: just an appetite for adventure.

Powerboating is suitable for older kids and adults, and sessions can be shared for maximum fun!

FAQs

Q: Don’t all boats have power? Isn’t this utterly redundant?
A: Not all boats have power like THIS!
Q: Sorry I can’t see what you are pointing at?
A: Oh right. Yes. Well if you could you’d know I was pointing at the great big 4-stroke engine of an amazingly speedy powerboat.
Q: But where do I come in?
A: We want to get you into one of these bad boys, so you can feel the unmitigated acceleration and frenzied power of their huge outboards.
Q: Where can I experience all this?
A: Most of our Powerboating goes down in the delightful Solent area of Hampshire, near the thoroughly nautical environs of Southampton.
Q: But what if I live many, many, many miles from there?
A: You can make a day of it and see the sights of the Solent area, or else see if there is another thrilling boat-based adventure closer to you. We have RIB rides and hovercrafting that takes place elsewhere in the UK.
Q: So these Powerboats, what are their names?
A: We have things like a 37ft Sunseeker powerboat or a Honda Formula 4-stroke raceboat; machines of speed and elegance. And the like.
Q: Should I bring my own Merman costume?
A: If any safety equipment or costuming is required, it will be provided on the day. But as you are involved in watery fun, it may be a good idea to have a change of clothes handy. For the actual boating you will usually be required to wear jeans or shorts and training or boat shoes.
Q: I like my Powerboating to possess some form of narrative arc. Can that be achieved?
A: Yes! With our amazing 007 Powerboat Adventure. You’ll enjoy two different powerboats, plus a number of ‘missions’ you will have to achieve in the style of our favourite spy Glen Chester. Sorry, I mean James Bond.
Q: Anything to stop me powerboating?
A: If you have any medical conditions that may stop you enjoying this high-octane pursuit, such as back and neck problems, then get in touch before you book and we can advise. It’s probably not ideal for really little kids, but 12 years and up is usually ok, though a parent may need to be present or sign a waiver.

Fun Facts

  • 1. Powerboating is generally considered to have begun in 1863 when Frenchman Jean Lenoir attached a petrol engine to a small boat. Probably ‘for a laugh’ but that’s how many great innovations are discovered.
  • 2. The first major powerboat race took place in 1903 across the English Channel and the sport appeared as an event in the 1908 Olympics. I don’t know if it was won by Major Powerboat, but if it was, that would be spooky.
  • 3. Most powerboats are driven by a high-speed jet of water as opposed to a propeller. Whereas I am driven by equals parts of rage and gassiness.
  • 4. The official water speed record is 511.11 km/h by Kenneth Warby in his hydroplane Spirit of Australia on Blowering Lake, New South Wales on 8 October 1978. Though as it was 1978 I imagine everyone was too busy disco dancing to notice.
  • 5. Tom McClean holds the world record as the first man to row across the Atlantic Ocean solo from west to east, which he achieved in 1969. There’s only one word for that: oars-some.
  • 6. The inspiration for Speed 2: Cruise Control came from director Jan De Bont, who came up with the idea for the film after he had a recurring nightmare about a cruise ship crashing into an island. And then he shared that nightmare with the world.
  • 7. One of the most memorable boat scenes in James Bond history is in Live and Let Die, when a 1972 Glastron GT150 chases through Louisiana. It is reported that the famous leap sequence took over 100 takes to get right. Whereas Roger Moore nailed the ‘looking suave, making a glib remark and adjusting his cufflinks’ scene in only 14 goes.
  • 8. The extraordinary Innespace Seabreacher craft is designed to dive underwater and fly on the surface, reaching speeds of up to 55mph and subsurface speeds of between 20 and 25mph. It is shaped like a dolphin, so if other curious dolphins start to get interested in your craft, try to act like your Seabreacher is already going out with someone.