Be Less Boring
My basket
  • Call us on: 020 8275 5256
    • Need help? Our customer services team are available by phone or via our online 'live chat' service.
    • Opening hours Monday - Friday
      9am - 5.30pm
      (excluding holidays)
    • Online help
    • Our FAQs cover most common questions:

Photography Experience Days

There are two simple facts of life when it comes to photography - one, no-one, and I mean no-one, is interested in photos you’ve taken of yourself at arms length in front of the ‘stunning’ scenery you enjoyed on your last holiday.

Second, you CANNOT take good photos with a phone camera. So what is the secret of photographical artistry? You can find out for yourself with one of our exclusive digital photography courses, available at 12 stunning locations around the country.

You’ll need your own camera, but we’ll throw in lunch because we’re nice like that.

FAQs

Q: Photography? But won’t that capture my soul and hold it on a piece of shiny paper?
A: Get with the programme! It’s the twentieth century! No one does that anymore.
Q: So what photographic elements can you shove my way?
A: This can go in two distinct directions, one where you are in front of the camera and one where you are behind it.
Q: Behind it? What, does it have a special bendy lens or something?
A: No you Muggle, we want to improve and hone your image capturing skills with a photographic course.
Q: That sounds hard.
A: It’s not in the slightest! We have a one day course where our experts will develop your digital photography skills, ensuring that you never take a dud shot ever again.
Q: But I can’t imagine I’ll be taking great snaps in a rec centre or youth club?
A: Then you’ll be delighted to hear that our courses run all over the UK, often at scenic sites such as the Shugborough Estate and the Severn Valley Railway, so you’ll have the opportunity to take some cracking snaps from the get go.
Q: But my camera is a very special one that I made myself out of velvet?
A: We have many different courses and tutors that specialise in different cameras and disciplines. Once you’ve bought your voucher, you can book the experience that’s best suited to your needs and location.
Q: Should I bring it along?
A: Yes, you to need to supply your own camera.
Q: But what if the notion of being a common tradesman disgusts me and my rightful place is in front of the camera?
A: Then we have a wide variety of photoshoots catered to practically every occasion. Whether it’s a family shot, one of your dog, a snap of your baby or just you looking marvellous, we’ve got loads. Even tasteful nude ones!
Q: Aye Carumba! I can assure you no one wants that.
A: Oh but that’s where you’re wrong. Very, very wrong.

Fun Facts

  • 1. Today we take as many photographs every two minutes than the whole of humanity did in the entire 1800s. Though back then the cameras were room sized and involved standing still for hours, so selfies were quite tricky.
  • 2. The most expensive camera ever sold was a rare 1923 Leica camera, which went for $2.8 million at auction in Vienna. That is so much money! And then you have to buy the film to put in it. I don’t think they thought this through.
  • 3. The longest photographic negative in the world is a panorama of Buenos Aires, Argentina which runs 129 feet, taken by Esteban Pastorino Diaz. Only comedian Frankie Boyle has been more negative for longer.
  • 4. The very first snapshot in the history of photography is thought to be ‘View from the Window’, dated 1826 by Joseph Niepce which took 8 hours to fully expose. I was about to mention something about ‘exposure’, ‘8 hours’ and ‘window’, but my legal team has instructed me that we need to wait until the court case is over.
  • 5. The first colour photograph was taken in 1861 by British Physicist James Maxwell. Well, unless you consider ‘black and white’ as colours, I suppose.
  • 6. A rudimentary digital camera was made in 1973, which created an image size of 100x100 pixels. It probably failed as that was never going to be enough pixels to capture the wide lapels and enormous flares that were in vogue at the time.
  • 7. Due to the long exposure times in Victorian photography, the mothers of children getting a portrait would be camouflaged into the scenery. So they tried to subdue the children by disguising their mums as pieces of furniture? I would find that quite unnerving, if my mother didn’t regularly do that anyway.
  • 8. Kodak, who developed one of the first digital cameras, went bankrupt because they failed to convert to digital technology. They had to Kodak to the drawing board.
  • 9. There are 12 Hasselblad cameras on the surface of the moon, left there to allow for the extra weight of the lunar rock samples to be brought back. So if you want to make some quick cash, just pop to the moon, pick those up and head to Cash Convertors.
  • 10. One of the first photographers of cats in amusing poses was English photographer Harry Pointer who worked during the 1870s. So when you dress your cat up as the Fonz and plaster it all over Facebook, you’re not being clever, you’re being Victorian.