Be Less Boring
My basket
  • Call us on: 020 8275 5256
    • Need help? Our customer services team are available by phone or via our online 'live chat' service.
    • Opening hours Monday - Friday
      9am - 5.30pm
      (excluding holidays)
    • Online help
    • Our FAQs cover most common questions:

Spa Breaks & Weekend Health Spa Packages

Spa Breaks: Everything you need to know

Make a date with a pal and escape to a spa for a couple of days.

These fantastic spa treats include an overnight stay in a double or twin room, so you can really make the most of the experience. (For maximum relaxation, we recommend not bringing anyone who snores like a train, but you’ll have to do your own research.)

The Hastings branch of Bannatyne’s boasts a state of the art Sensory Spa and an air-conditioned gym, and we’ll chuck in a free treatment too: choose a massage or a posh Elemis facial. It’s located near the coast and there’s a golf course within putting distance as well.

Alternatively, you can choose the fabulous Rowhill Grange spa in Kent which has a special Japanese therapy pool (don’t worry, nobody’s going to ask you to make sushi underwater), plus an exceptionally swish gym and a range of treatments to choose from.

You’ll also be treated to a voucher towards the cost of your evening meal, and you’ll get breakfast in the morning. All you need to worry about is how the TV remote control works. Rowhill Grange has won literally squillions of awards, so there’s no better place to unwind.

On the menu

FAQs

Q: Words confuse me? What’s the difference between a spa voucher and a spa break?
A: In a word: sleepy times! With a spa day pass, you get kicked out when it’s time to pull the shutters down (unless you purchase an additional stay at a hotel or hide under a massage table). Spa break vouchers combine the hotel stay with the spa pass for a more luxurious experience.
Q: Besides the chance to meet some form of receptionist, what else happens?
A: Lots-o-things! Use of all the facilities at the spa for a day, plus a night in a hotel. Often extra freebies, like a massage, a meal or two or perhaps a buffet lunch, will be chucked in too. Sort of depends which spa break you pick and also go for.
Q: But what is there to do? What? What?
A: Beautiful things that your cloudy mind will envelope and cherish. Most spas have steam rooms, saunas, Jacuzzis and classes: some also offer hydrotherapy, sports massages, beauty treatments and Japanese therapy pools. You may be able to get facials and pedicures and a whole host of other treatments. Depending on which spa break you go for, there’ll be different activities involved.
Q: But what about my husband? He’s a man?
A: Of course he is! That’s completely fine, we have special packages for couples which involve treatments aimed at dudes, bros and fellas.
Q: And what variety of establishment are we dealing with here? Average?
A: Not a bit of it! Both the spas and the hotels attached to them are super posh, top of the range locales. They are all over the UK and they are swank with a capital SWA! Some are in the countryside, some are city based. All totally plush.
Q: What should I bring? Pants?
A: As this will be an overnight stay, yes you may wish to bring some extra pants. Besides that usually guests must bring their own bathing suit and gym wear. Often lockers, towels, robes and slippers are provided by the spa for use on the day, but this may vary at different locations, so check the small print when booking, or just ask us.
Q: Can I let the kids play in the sauna while I’m off doing my thing?
A: These spa breaks are usually for one or two adults 18 years old and above. So no kids, no.
Q: What about grub? Should I bring my portable barbecue?
A: Please don’t, either an evening meal or a breakfast the next morning may well be included. Again, it depends on where you go and the sort of package you pick. Check with us or them if you are not sure what’s happening grub wise.

Fun Facts

  • 1. The ESPA in Hong Kong sits on the 116th and 118th floors of the Ritz-Carlton International Commerce Center, making it the highest spa on Earth. And I bet their prices are high too! Oh, no, they are actually quite reasonable.
  • 2. Chocolate is often used in spa treatments as it’s an antioxidant, and helps to boost the body's natural collagen production. But that doesn’t mean you should rub Drifters on you while watching Strictly, leave it to the professionals.
  • 3. One spa in Indonesia uses snakes as part of their massage therapy, with several pythons draped over the customer’s body. They must hear that ‘fangs a lot’ joke more than is healthy.
  • 4. Henlow Grange was one of the UK’s first health farms, opening in 1960 and is now owned by Champneys. Surely a 1960’s heath farm must have been one of the sauciest locations in the country. I can picture Robin Asquith gurning around every corner.
  • 5. One of the world’s most expensive spa treatments is at Spa V at the Hotel Victor where customers pay $5,000 to sit in a tub sprinkled with rose petals and filled with 1,000 bottles of Evian water. Or you could grab your hose and roll around in the back garden, save yourself a few quid.
  • 6. In 1842, a house in Cincinnati, Ohio, received the first indoor bathtub in the United States. But what did drunken party revellers sleep in before that?
  • 7. The word sauna is an ancient Finnish word referring to the traditional Scandinavian bath and to the bathhouse itself. I feel there is also something intrinsically smutty about the phrase ‘Finnish sauna’.
  • 8. A ‘Temazcal’ is a type of sweat lodge which originated with pre-Hispanic Indigenous peoples in Mesoamerica, with some thought to be 1200 years old. Is it also a niche brand of tequila? I swear I’ve had some forgettable nights with a bottle of Temazcal.
  • 9. In Finland, the Saunatonttu, literally translated as the sauna elf, is a little gnome that was believed to live in the sauna. It was customary to warm up the sauna or to leave some food outside for him. I definitely saw a small, fat, hairy dude the last time I took a sauna. Think it was him?
  • 10. Heubad is an Austrian traditional hay bath with more than 200 years of history. Bathers immerse themselves in hay which releases heat from bio-decomposition. Hay: whatever floats your boat.